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From Jerome E. Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security
April 23, 2013

NEWPORT, R.I. -- U.S. Naval War College (NWC) professor Thomas G. Mahnken, the Jerome E. Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security, co-sponsored the workshop “Not Peace but a Sword: Arms Races in International Politics from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries” in London, England, April 11-13. 
U.S. Naval War College (NWC) professor Thomas G. Mahnken, center, the Jerome E. Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security, co-sponsored the workshop “Not Peace but a Sword: Arms Races in International Politics from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries” in London, England, April 11-13.

The project was developed in cooperation with professor Joseph A. Maiolo of King’s College London and professor David Stevenson of the London School of Economics.  Also participating in the event were NWC’s professors Timothy Hoyt, John Maurer, and Toshi Yoshihara.

During the first section of the workshop, Dr. Matthew Seligmann of Brunel University discussed the pre-World War I Anglo-German naval race, while Stevenson discussed the competition in land armaments during the same period.  The participants then moved on to explore the arms dynamic in the period separating the two world wars, with papers by professor Evan Mawdsley of the University of Glasgow on land armaments, Maiolo on naval construction, and professor Richard Overy of Exeter University on air armaments.  

U.S. Naval War College (NWC) professor Thomas G. Mahnken, the Jerome E. Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security, co-sponsored the workshop “Not Peace but a Sword: Arms Races in International Politics from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries” in London, England, April 11-13.The third section of the workshop, devoted to the Cold War arms race, included  a roundtable on the United States and a paper by Dr. Sergei Radchenko of the University of Nottingham on the Soviet Union, as well as a presentation by Vojtech Mastny of the National Security Archive on NATO and the Warsaw Pact.

The workshop’s final session was devoted to arms races outside Europe and arms developments since the Cold War.  Professor Rudra Chaudhuri of King’s College London spoke on South Asia, professor Avi Kober of Bar Ilan University discussed the Middle East, and professor Tai Ming Cheung of the University of California San Diego spoke on China and its neighbors.  

Mahnken provided the final presentation, discussing armaments developments since the Cold War.