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130609-N-OD443-026 NEWPORT, RI (June 19, 2013) Members of a panel discuss 21st century sea power and global maritime leadership during the annual Current Strategy Forum (CSF) at U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, R.I. The panel was held as part of the annual CSF, the final academic event of the year, which serves as an opportunity for military and civilian leadership to join NWC students and faculty to discuss future strategy of the U.S. and debate national and international security. The panel members included Carlyle A. Thayer, professor emeritus, The University of New South Wales at the Australian Defense Force Academy, Andrew Lambert, professor of naval history for the Department of War Studies at King’s College, London, James R. Kurth, professor of political science emeritus and senior research scholar at Swarthmore College and panel moderator, NWC’s Toshi Yoshihara, John A. van Beuren chair of Asia-Pacific studies and affiliate member of the China Maritime Studies Institute.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Monique LaRouche/Released)


By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Monique LaRouche, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. — U.S. Naval War College (NWC) students and faculty participated in a panel discussion focused on 21st century sea power and global maritime leadership as part of the NWC’s annual Current Strategy Forum (CSF), June 19.

The panel and two-day forum was the final event of the academic year for students before their graduation. Additionally, the CSF served as an opportunity for military and civilian leadership to join students and faculty to discuss future strategy of the U.S. and debate national and international security issues.

“The CSF is a great forum to debate ideas,” said NWC student Cmdr. Brook Dewalt. “It’s an opportunity to take a critical look at our current situation and address our nation.”

The panel consisted of professors Carlyle A. Thayer, Australian Defense Force Academy, Andrew Lambert, King’s College London, and James. R. Kurth, Swarthmore College. NWC professor Toshi Yoshihara served as the panel moderator.

Thayer addressed the audience from an Australian standpoint and provided an outside perspective of U.S. strategy.

“The air sea battle is a limited objective concept,” said Thayer. “It is not an operational plan or a strategy for a specific region or adversary. It deals with global, anti-access area denial strategies; it aims at reducing risk, preserving the U.S. ability to project power, and maintain freedom of action in the global commons,” said Thayer.

During the discussion, Lambert stressed the importance of new ideas in the 21st century and learning from the past.

“Poor decision making can bring you down,” said Lambert. “If you make bad decisions it could ruin your system. If you know how your [predecessors] handled these issues then you will be better prepared to handle them.”

Students and faculty valued the panel’s forethought and varied perspectives of U.S. strategy.

“I appreciate the panel’s insights and their assumptions on our challenges,” said NWC student Lt. Cmdr. Jimmy Wang. “They do not sugar coat our challenges.”

“A strong military is important,” said NWC student U.S. Air Force Maj. Mark Donahue. “The forum provides opportunities not only to learn, but to teach.”

In addition to the sea power and global maritime leadership panel, additional keynote speakers and panel discussions were provided on U.S. grand strategy and actual outcomes and 21st century security challenges.

“It is a great opportunity, as students, to bring together ideas,” concluded Dewalt. “Synthesizing information and having a current perspective, puts the focus at hand.”

Recorded lectures and panel discussions from the event can be found on the college's YouTube channel, at http://www.usnwc.edu/csf13.


Edited by Chief Mass Communication Specialist James E. Foehl
Posted by Daniel S. Marciniak