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Professor Stanley Carpenter begins his lecture on the American Revolution at NSWC Port Hueneme Division on Oct. 22.
PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Oct. 22, 2013) U.S. Naval War College professor Stanley Carpenter, College of Distance Education, speaks to students about the American Revolution at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division. (Courtesy photo)


From Alyce Moncourtois, NSWC Port Hueneme Command Communications Office
Nov. 27, 2013
 
Professor Stanley Carpenter focused in on his class material as he began a lecture on Oct. 22 for students enrolled in the “Strategy and War” course offered at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division (NSWC PHD). The course is part of a graduate seminar program offered in conjunction with the Naval War College in Rhode Island.
 
As he begins class, Carpenter informs students that “the purpose of this course is to get you to think strategically.” 
 
The lecture that night focused on the American Revolution. After three weeks of intense study on this topic, the class will move on to another historical case study.
 
As the Strategy and Policy Division Head for the College of Distance Education at the Naval War College, Carpenter is a subject matter expert who travels throughout the United States teaching on the topic of strategy and war. 
 
According to Carpenter, the course on strategy and war “is just one of three challenging courses that students face to earn their graduate degree.” He says the program is intense and demanding with a “significant amount of work outside the classroom.” 
 
Since fiscal 2000, NSWC PHD has provided civilian employees (GS-11 and above) and military officers (active duty and reserve, 03 and above) from local naval commands with the opportunity to participate in this post-baccalaureate program.
 
The “Strategy and War” course is one of three required courses in the curriculum. The other two are “Theater Security and Decision-Making” and “Joint Military Operations.” The course of study is designed to give civilian and military employees an executive-level, global perspective of national policy and strategy, national security decision-making, and joint maritime operations. Upon completion, the students will be able to develop a coherent framework for analysis of decisions involving the use of force to achieve national objectives. 
 
The program consists of one 32-35 week course per year for three years under the direction of a Naval War College adjunct faculty member and guest speakers. Classes meet once per week from September through May. All courses include written exams, extensive reading, essay writing, and class discussion. 
 
With the completion of all three courses, students are awarded a command and staff diploma from the Naval War College and a Joint Professional Military Education Phase I Certification. With the completion of seven additional credits (offered on-line), students can receive a Master of Arts in security and strategic studies. 
 
Carpenter earned his bachelor’s degree in history from the University of North Carolina; his master’s in British military history from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland; and his Ph.D. in British military history from Florida State University. 
 
NSWC PHD is located at Naval Base Ventura County. It is the Navy’s premier in-service engineering and logistics center and has been in existence for 50 years. The command provides test and evaluation, in-service engineering, and integrated logistics support for weapon and combat systems installed in the United States Navy fleet, United States Coast Guard fleet, and many foreign navy fleets. NSWC PHD’s focus is to provide safe, effective, and affordable weapon systems to surface ships.